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Savage River Loop Trail – Denali National Park, Alaska

Savage River Loop Trail in Denali National Park, Alaska

Savage River Loop Trail in Denali National Park, Alaska

The Savage River Loop Trail is a flat, relatively easy trail – and my favorite spot (that I’ve encountered so far) in amazing Denali National Park.

The trail starts at the parking lot – and dropoff point for the Savage River Shuttle bus – and parallels the river for about a mile until it crosses the river on a wooden bridge, then heads back to the starting point on the opposite side. A simple trail, but it is beautiful. You’re never far from the river, which starts as a wide, briaded river at the beginning, then narrows into a well-defined channel further along the trail. Looking around, you’ll see mostly treeless terrain that juts up into rocky hills. Purple lupines and pink fireweed line the trail during the summer.

Lots of birds frequent this area, and you’re almost guaranteed to see small wildlife, mostly squirrels. You may even get lucky and spy a moose or a Dall sheep.

  • Savage River Loop Trail in Denali National Park, Alaska
  • Savage River Loop Trail in Denali National Park, Alaska
  • Savage River Loop Trail in Denali National Park, Alaska
  • Savage River Loop Trail in Denali National Park, Alaska
  • Savage River Loop Trail in Denali National Park, Alaska
  • Savage River Loop Trail in Denali National Park, Alaska
  • Lupine along the Savage River Loop Trail in Denali National Park, Alaska
  • Savage River Loop Trail in Denali National Park, Alaska
  • Lupines and fireweed along the Savage River Loop Trail in Denali National Park, Alaska
  • Savage River Loop Trail in Denali National Park, Alaska
  • Savage River Loop Trail in Denali National Park, Alaska
  • Savage River Loop Trail in Denali National Park, Alaska
  • Savage River Loop Trail in Denali National Park, Alaska
  • Savage River Loop Trail in Denali National Park, Alaska
  • Savage River Loop Trail in Denali National Park, Alaska
  • Savage River Loop Trail in Denali National Park, Alaska
  • Savage River Loop Trail in Denali National Park, Alaska
  • Savage River Loop Trail in Denali National Park, Alaska

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Angel Rocks Trail near Fairbanks, Alaska

Angel Rocks TrailWhen I asked a local what trail I should try first in the Chena River State Recreation Area, her response was immediate: Angel Rocks Trail.

The trail begins with a wide graded path meandering along the amazing Chena River for about 3/4 of a mile. Then the trail climbs a steep 800 feet over the next mile to a granite rock formation, the Angel Rocks. Keep an eye out for a spur trail just past the one mile from the trailhead for a spot to fill up with crystal clear, cold, drinkable water.

After reaching the top at around 1800 feet above sea level, you’ll have great views of the surrounding wilderness. At the top, you have three choices. Go back the way you came or continue on the Angel Rocks loop back to the original trailhead (the downgrade is very steep in places), which is shown in my map and is about 3.5 miles in total distance. Your third option is to continue another 6.5 miles to the Chena Hot Springs Resort, which has a natural hot springs lake and a few dining options. Best to have a second car waiting for you there unless you want to relax and then reverse the same route back to the original trailhead.

  • Angel Rocks Trail east of Fairbanks, Alaska
  • Chena River on the Angel Rocks Trail east of Fairbanks, Alaska
  • Birch trees on the Angel Rocks Trail east of Fairbanks, Alaska
  • Angel Rocks Trail east of Fairbanks, Alaska
  • Chena River on the Angel Rocks Trail east of Fairbanks, Alaska
  • Angel Rocks Trail east of Fairbanks, Alaska
  • Angel Rocks Trail east of Fairbanks, Alaska
  • Angel Rocks Trail east of Fairbanks, Alaska
  • Angel Rocks Trail east of Fairbanks, Alaska
  • Angel Rocks Trail east of Fairbanks, Alaska
  • Chena River on the Angel Rocks Trail east of Fairbanks, Alaska
  • Chena River on the Angel Rocks Trail east of Fairbanks, Alaska

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Reynolds Lane Trail near Fairbanks, Alaska

Fireweed near Fairbanks, AlaskaThis is not a public trail and can only be accessed when staying on a property through Airbnb. Your accommodations will be an incredible yurt run by a local dog musher.

The trail starts at the back of her property and is an easy and straightforward 1.5 miles of flat path through a birch forest. It loops through the woods and ends back at the driveway of the property.

I was there in early July when a mosquito net hat was as necessary as pants. The trail, according to the property owner, was “a little damp.”

  • My yurt off Chena Hot Springs Road east of Fairbanks, Alaska
  • Fireweed near Fairbanks, Alaska
  • The trail was described as  'a little damp'
  • Hike behind my yurt off Chena Hot Springs Road east of Fairbanks, Alaska
  • Lupines near Fairbanks, Alaska
  • Hike behind my yurt off Chena Hot Springs Road east of Fairbanks, Alaska

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Walking Tour of Barrow, Alaska

Midnight sun over cemetery in Barrow, AlaskaBarrow, Alaska, is the northernmost town in the United States, and the spit that extends into the Arctic Ocean north of town is the northernmost point in the country (that point is on private land so most can only get to within a mile).

Barrow is a fascinating town and is unlike most others in the U.S. Due to the harsh climate, its streets are dirt, and the weather ranges from cold in the summer to frigid in the winter. While I was there in July, the high topped out at 38 degrees.

The buildings are utilitarian in design and most are on stilts to prevent foundation damage that would occur if they were embedded in permafrost. Most homes and buildings have indoor plumbing, but a few still do not. Ask a local about the town’s honey buckets.

The people are friendly, and the town’s few restaurants are surprisingly good (albeit VERY expensive). I stayed at the King Eider Inn, just a few steps from the airport exit. It’s a comfortable but basic hotel with fine wood furnishings, a sauna, Wifi and a helpful staff. And like everything else in Barrow, it’s quite expensive.

Note: Some of the photos shown are not on the route mapped. All are in and around Barrow, however. To get the best tour, I recommend calling Mike Shultz at (907) 852-3972. He’s lived in Barrow for over 40 years and knows the town well. He offered to pick me up 10 minutes after I called and spent three hours driving and walking me around the town. He’s an affable guy who loves to share his local knowledge with visitors.

  • One of the nicer houses - with a small tank in the yard - in Barrow, Alaska
  • Midnight sun over Barrow, Alaska
  • Midnight sun over cemetery in Barrow, Alaska
  • Whaling boat race on the beach of the Arctic Ocean in Barrow, Alaska
  • Typical dirt street in Barrow, Alaska
  • Many of the dumpsters scattered around town had murals painted on them - Barrow, Alaska
  • Bowhead whale jawbone on display in Barrow, Alaska
  • Football field in Barrow, Alaska
  • Arctic Ocean beach in Barrow, Alaska
  • A whale bone skull sits out front of City Hall in Barrow, Alaska
  • Cemetery and satellite dishes south of the airport in Barrow, Alaska
  • Road leading back to town from the spit in Barrow, Alaska

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Bishop Beach – Homer, Alaska

Bishop Beach on Kachemak Bay in Homer, Alaska

Bishop Beach on Kachemak Bay in Homer, Alaska

A walk along Bishop Beach on the Kachemak Bay south of Homer is a nice relaxing walk. And at low tide, you have plenty of beach to explore with expansive views of the mountains across the bay.

LIke any beach, there’s no set trail. Just wander at will. There can be tide pools and temporary rivers flowing caused by the tide.

Dress warmly! Even when I went in early June, I wore a winter coat, hiking boots and a stocking cap… And I was still happy to get to a nearby coffee shop for some warmth after!

  • Bishop Beach on Kachemak Bay in Homer, Alaska
  • Crab on Bishop Beach on Kachemak Bay in Homer, Alaska
  • Bishop Beach on Kachemak Bay in Homer, Alaska

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Two Lakes Trail – Seward, Alaska

Two Lakes Trail in Seward, Alaska

Two Lakes Trail in Seward, Alaska

Two Lakes Trail in the town of Seward is a quick, easy and scenic walk suitable for all ages. The full trail is less than one mile, with little elevation change, is well-maintained and easy to follow, and loops around back to your starting point.

But easy doesn’t mean boring. The name doesn’t lie – the trail winds around two lakes, the first at the trailhead at the south point and the second at the north end. A small waterfall cascades down the imposing Mount Marathon from the west toward the north lake and makes for a perfect backdrop for photos.

Pine trees and moss fill your view with green, but watch out for the dreaded Devil’s Club plant! It’s fascinating to look at, but don’t touch its spikes!

  • Two Lakes Trail in Seward, Alaska
  • Two Lakes Trail in Seward, Alaska
  • Two Lakes Trail in Seward, Alaska
  • Two Lakes Trail in Seward, Alaska
  • Two Lakes Trail in Seward, Alaska
  • Devil's Club on Two Lakes Trail in Seward, Alaska
  • Two Lakes Trail in Seward, Alaska
  • Two Lakes Trail in Seward, Alaska

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